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Adventurers In Spirit

Dear Friend,

I think that most people would not find me particularly adventurous. I don’t climb mountains or bike across a continent. Often my “adventures” are more cerebral.

When I speak about adventure, I think that most people react to and perceive that word much as I typically do. They imagine physically dangerous or rigorous activities. They think adrenaline must be the primary component of adventure.

However, I’m not talking about that sort of adventure. Certainly, such activities could be quite adventurous. Unless your day job is mountain rescue or cross country transport. In which cases such activities might even become a bit routine.

Adventure in the context that I promote it is the activity of moving outside of your comfort zone for the specific purpose of pursuing your deeply held dreams. It does generally involve taking perceived risks, although those risks, like changing a job or selling everything to live on a boat in Tahiti, are often not of the life threatening type.

In fact, the biggest perceived risk for most adventurers of my ilk is a fear of ridicule or non-acceptance by our family and friends. A fear that we won’t garner the permission of those around us today to strikeout and live a life that holds true meaning for us but that they may just never understand.

I make this pointed distinction in my definition of adventure because I don’t want some folks who have no adrenaline addiction or desire for physical challenge to overlook my message.

There are dozens of media out there talking about the finer points of adventure sports. I am not one of those. My message is to your heart. My mission is to rekindle the “true you” that is living deep down inside of you, and to help you to refocus a life that the acceptance of adult responsibilities has turned astray. I am trying to reach all “adventurers in spirit.”

I am also determined to burst false and outdated teachings that many of us accept without question. Such as the idea that adventure is for kids. And that adulthood is one long misery laden responsibility after another, followed by a “glorious” retirement that never actually arrives.

Such viewpoints affect people’s attitudes toward their children, turning them into impediments to true happiness, rather than embracing them as the co-travelers on the road to discovery that they really are.

I hope that all of you adventurers in spirit will stick with me on this journey of discovery! I know that you will not be disappointed!

All the best,

Hugh

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