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Why I Love the Snow

Fun in the Snow

Fun in the Snow

Dear Friend,

I’ve really been enjoying the snow that has blanketed North America recently.

It has been a joy to watch it fall from the sky.  And even the rain has frozen into sheets of ice that the kids love to mess with.

If you knew me in my past you would find the above statements shocking.

You see, I used to hate snow.  I had to drive to work everyday, and I hated driving in the stuff.  And in the ice, the sleet, the mud, you name it.

In truth, I had always enjoyed unusual weather, but once I “grew up” I simply couldn’t enjoy it anymore.  I thought that this was just one more aspect of adulthood that sucked.

In recent years, as I have tailored my lifestyle in ways that better fit my nature, I have rediscovered my love of unusual weather.  And where we live, snow is unusual.  At least it was, until this winter!

Today I find that I am able to enjoy many things that I could not enjoy before.  And when these many small, enjoyable things in my life accumulate and multiply, what I am left with is a life worth living.

It is impossible for me to convey how much of a difference this change in my life has made.  How much relief I feel.  How much more color that I see in life.

I am able to enjoy the little things that were mere annoyances before.  And I am able to be close to my children in ways that were impossible for me before.

I let go of my old life and chose to intentionally direct my new life.  And I’ve never looked back!

So now I say, “Let it snow!”

Talk to you again soon,

Hugh

{ 12 comments… add one }
  • Christopher Kabamba February 13, 2010, 9:10 am

    Hey, Hugh!

    Great!
    It is really a mark of growth and a deeper understanding of life to be “able to enjoy the little things that were mere annoyances before”.

    I love the statement in Bruce Mau’s Incomplete Manifesto; it speaks volumes about what you have touched upon in that statement. It talks about the ability to “allow ourselves to experience events and become changed my them” as the “preliguisite” for growth.

    And experiencing certain events…big or small is something we all want to shrink away from. But as we give of ourselves to events of life, we transcend resentments and anoyances and we grow as conscious beings.

    Thank you.

  • Christopher Kabamba February 13, 2010, 4:10 am

    Hey, Hugh!

    Great!
    It is really a mark of growth and a deeper understanding of life to be “able to enjoy the little things that were mere annoyances before”.

    I love the statement in Bruce Mau’s Incomplete Manifesto; it speaks volumes about what you have touched upon in that statement. It talks about the ability to “allow ourselves to experience events and become changed my them” as the “preliguisite” for growth.

    And experiencing certain events…big or small is something we all want to shrink away from. But as we give of ourselves to events of life, we transcend resentments and anoyances and we grow as conscious beings.

    Thank you.

  • Josh Hanagarne February 13, 2010, 6:22 pm

    Most things that upset us truly are not worth worrying about. They just don’t matter that much, even though they may feel like it.

    It’s snowing here right now:)

  • Josh Hanagarne February 13, 2010, 1:22 pm

    Most things that upset us truly are not worth worrying about. They just don’t matter that much, even though they may feel like it.

    It’s snowing here right now:)

  • Bruce February 14, 2010, 3:49 pm

    Your post makes me wonder, with the unexpected snowfall , if people that live in areas with a change of seasons are more likely to be adaptive and more receptive to change in their daily lives. I grew up in South Florida and have lived in VA for the past 8 years. I appreciate the change of seasons I now experience and feel it has helped me be more open to changes in the routine of life. So I’m with you Hugh, let it snow! and for that matter… let it rain, whirl, toast and shine.

  • Bruce February 14, 2010, 10:49 am

    Your post makes me wonder, with the unexpected snowfall , if people that live in areas with a change of seasons are more likely to be adaptive and more receptive to change in their daily lives. I grew up in South Florida and have lived in VA for the past 8 years. I appreciate the change of seasons I now experience and feel it has helped me be more open to changes in the routine of life. So I’m with you Hugh, let it snow! and for that matter… let it rain, whirl, toast and shine.

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 6:45 pm

    Thanks so much, Christopher!

    Fantastic thoughts! Surrendering to the moment and just being aware of what is around us really is liberating!

    All the best,

    Hugh

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 1:45 pm

    Thanks so much, Christopher!

    Fantastic thoughts! Surrendering to the moment and just being aware of what is around us really is liberating!

    All the best,

    Hugh

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 6:47 pm

    Thanks Josh!

    I think it was Mark Twain who spoke of all of the difficulties he had experienced in life, most of which never happened! 🙂

    Hugh

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 1:47 pm

    Thanks Josh!

    I think it was Mark Twain who spoke of all of the difficulties he had experienced in life, most of which never happened! 🙂

    Hugh

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 6:52 pm

    Thanks for commenting, Bruce! 🙂

    It’s an interesting theory. As someone who has lived in both climates, you are well suited to look into it. As we travel the continent, we have certainly noticed subtle differences in the culture and attitudes of different areas.

    I have to admit, I like tropical climates. But I have never lived a full year in one. And spending a few weeks in a snowy cabin each year might just be a great way to enjoy the positive impact that change can have on our attitudes.

    All the best,

    Hugh

  • Hugh DeBurgh February 14, 2010, 1:52 pm

    Thanks for commenting, Bruce! 🙂

    It’s an interesting theory. As someone who has lived in both climates, you are well suited to look into it. As we travel the continent, we have certainly noticed subtle differences in the culture and attitudes of different areas.

    I have to admit, I like tropical climates. But I have never lived a full year in one. And spending a few weeks in a snowy cabin each year might just be a great way to enjoy the positive impact that change can have on our attitudes.

    All the best,

    Hugh

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